Course Information

 

for Master of Arts: Counselling Department


Communication and Listening Skills (MAC 600)

Credits:3

The course will examine types of listening, models of effective verbal and non-verbal communication, problem solving strategies, analysis vs. understanding; games people play, leadership styles, counselling ethics, etc.

Development of a Philosophical Perspective of Counselling (MAC 610)

Credits:3

Conflict Management and Interpersonal Relations (MAC 630)

Credits:3

A focus on group interaction skills and the management of individual and professional priorities will be emphasized. Some of the areas covered will include behavioral style analysis, verbal and non-verbal communication processes within groups, conflict management including mediation, understanding and controlling emotions. The aim is to help the students to better understand themselves, their strengths and weaknesses, as well as to help them seek better ways of understanding and relating to others in counselling situations.

Interventions in Behavioral Disorders (MAC 640)

Credits:3

This course examines intervention strategies with guilt (spiritual, psychological, and ontological), anxiety, inhibition and fear, depression (exogenous, endogenous, and existential), pessimism, defensiveness, anger, resentment, self-centeredness, low self-image, loneliness, etc. Special emphasis will be given to the use of behavior therapies.

Legal, Ethical, & Practical Issues in Counselling (MAC 660)

Credits:3

This course will review the ethical, legal and professional issues within the practice of counselling, including the issues of ethical leadership. Primary attention will be given to issues of personal integrity, clients’ rights, confidentiality, record keeping, legal concerns, testing certification and licensure. Emphasis will be on the counsellor’s responses to counselling situations and the process of resolving ethical dilemmas and maintaining professional competency.

Life Span Counselling (MAC 670)

Credits:3

This course will examine the developmental issues in childhood, adolescence, adulthood and the aging process, as well as, socio-cultural influences and process implications in counselling and the preventive and ameliorative care through the stages, passages, and crises of life. Students will be required to write a 6000 words integration paper with appropriate clinical interventions including counselling techniques used with one of the following: children, youth or with adults. Pre-requisite: PS 260 Developmental Psychology

Youth Guidance & Development (MAC 672)

Credits:1

Psychopathology (MAC 680)

Credits:3

This course will focus on major contemporary theories of psychopathology and how these relate to abnormal individual and family functioning. It will examine the categorization of psychopathology including etiology, assessment and diagnosis of such phenomena as mood disorders, personality disorders, and various kinds of chemical dependencies using the DSM-IVR as the basis for evaluation. It will also examine the role of the counsellor as a holistic care facilitator with an interest in psychological, psychiatric, and social service referral resources; visitation to and development of a file on one’s local referral resources, as well as, types of psycho- pharmaceuticals used in the treatment of psychopathology. Pre-requisite: PS 410 Abnormal psychology

Assessment and Diagnosis (MAC 710)

Credits:3

This course is a study of human attributes (aptitudes, abilities, personality, interests, and mental status) and their role as behavioral determinants. Methodological issues encountered in the assessment of psychological traits and types will be covered. Assisting counselling personnel in acquiring the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to obtain records and appraise information regarding an individual will also be included. Attention will be given to the administration and use of standardized tests, scales, inventories, interviews, and collateral information. Pre-requisite: PS 400 Psychological Tests and Measurements

Career Counselling (MAC 720)

Credits:3

The course will introduce students to the fundamentals of career counselling drawing on contemporary counseling theory and practice. The student gains a solid academic grounding in the theory of career counselling and a comprehensive understanding of the needs, issues and concerns of clients. The stages of the career counselling process are explored together with client assessment and the use of assessment instruments when working with clients. Detailed treatment is given to job hunting skills, interpersonal relationships on the job, financial planning and coping with changes. The module ends with guidelines on developing a Vocational /Career Counselling Assessment programme in schools.

Research Methods (MAC 730)

Credits:3

Advanced Counselling Skills (MAC 740)

Credits:3

The course will equip students to cope with the challenges of living in the post-modern age. The approach will be integrative and engage students to use various theoretical Constraints such as Psychoanalytical Therapy, Adlerian Therapy, Reality Therapy, Behaviour Therapy, Person Centered Therapy, Gestalt Psycho Drama, Re-decision Therapy, Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Feminist Therapy, and Family System Therapy. Students will be required to demonstrate how therapy might be applied to a variety of cases and how concepts and techniques might be borrowed from a variety of theoretical models and applied to the different phases of the Counselling process.

Group Procedures in Counselling (MAC 750)

Credits:3

The course examines the process dynamics of groups including group development, leadership, norms and therapeutic factors. Group counselling theories and approaches used for other group work including skills, personal growth, support, vocational, and developmental guidance groups are included. Knowledge and skills of how to facilitate therapeutic groups are included. Students will be required to be participants/observers or facilitators of a group outside of class time.

Research Methods II (MAC 770)

Credits:3

This course was updated to 3 credits with the introduction of new emphases in the MAC programme.

Practicum and Portfolio (MAC 780)

Credits:3

The practicum of 100 hours is concurrent with the program during the first year of study. The student documents in a portfolio the hours involved in classroom participation, observation and in counselling by profiling the problem and what was discussed. The student takes this information to a qualified consultant for his/her observations about the student’s approach to the problem concerned in the counselling experience. The consultant will make written comments. The MAC Programme reviews the total activity. Prerequisites: To commence Practicum students must have completed 16 PF Psychological evaluation, as well as, commenced therapy. Students must complete at least 6 courses including MAC 590, MAC 610 and MAC 740.

Internship and Portfolio (MAC 790)

Credits:6

A 200 hours internship programme in which students learn and reflect upon the skills required for effective counselling in a number of specialized settings including hospitals, schools, parishes, prisons, family clinics, courts, police stations, hospices and community organizations serving HIV/AIDS patients, the homeless, the mentally ill, and the homebound. Utilizing didactic seminars, group process and individual supervision, the program offers students internship experience and provides them with an integration of psychological models and theories of counselling, as well as, a theological perspective for understanding the issues that arise from this experience. Prerequisites: To commence Internship students must complete 16PF evaluation and a minimum of 10 therapy sessions. Also students must complete a minimum of 10 courses including MAC 670, 680 and/or at least one course in the area of Emphasis. Permission of the Practicum/Internship Coordinator is required before acceptance by the director of the chosen institution where students desire to gain experience.

Interventions in Addictive Disorders (MACAC 601)

Credits:3

This course prepares student for conducting interventions, as well as, for work in organizations that address the effects of addiction on the individual, the family, and the society. Firstly, students will acquire knowledge of addiction, and the influences leading to addictive behaviours. Students will be exposed to the theoretical bases on which various interventions have been developed, and the response to the problem of addiction locally and in other countries. Secondly, students will be encouraged to utilize the new information in formulating approaches toward relating to addicted persons, and ministering to them in a non-judgmental manner. Finally, throughout the course, students will be sharing and reflecting on the new information and experiences obtained from readings, and review of research studies, and the ways in which their learning has been developed.

Interventions in Forensic Populations (MACFC 600)

Credits:3

The course examines approaches to intervention employed by psychologists in various forensic populations such as: sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel settings. It will focus on the theory and practice of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as, recent developments in intervention, including restorative justice. Areas to be covered will include: the assessment, treatment and prevention of child maltreatment; interviewing child witnesses; specific issues in interventions with crime victims; dealing with spousal violence; counselling and mediation in the Family Court; the prevention of juvenile offending; and the interventions involving violent offenders.

Consultations and Testimony in Forensic Psychology (MACFC 601)

Credits:3

This course offers an overview of ethical, legal and professional practice issues to be considered when clinicians are asked to provide consultation and/or testimony in court proceedings. Consultation and court-room testimony will be differentiated. Informed standards in providing both forensic consultations and court-room testimony will be highlighted. Consultation scenarios and mock testimonies will be an integral aspect of this course.

Professional and Ethical Practice (Forensic) I (MACFC 602)

Credits:3

This course has a practical component and provides an introduction to skills training in a variety of tasks undertaken by forensic psychologists. It focuses on practical training of forensic skills and a thorough understanding of ethical principles and practices within professional settings. Attendance at one-day workshops and meetings is required. Skills training include: interviewing, cognitive techniques, providing expert testimony, and interviewing children. There is a strong focus on the code of professional conduct, and ethical issues that arise in the context of working with individuals, cultural groups, organizations, other professionals and the public at large. To meet the requirements of this course student must complete at least 100 hours of professional practice, including professional seminars, workshops, and external placements. All placement and activity associated with this course must be done in writing with the approval of the Course facilitator. A Course portfolio is required for the organization and documentation of the practical component of this course. This portfolio shall constitute 60% of course work. Students have a maximum of 30 days to complete the requirements of this part of the course. Students must complete a minimum of three different field placements, which may include the courts, police, prisons, or other related forensic settings. N.B. Students are advised to take fulltime leave in order to meet the demands of this course.

Professional and Ethical Practice (Forensic) II (MACFC 603)

Credits:3

This represents a continuation of the course Professional and Ethical Practice In addition to field placements, this course continues with the training of psychological skills and ethical practices required in the professional context. Attendance at workshops and meetings is required. Skills training includes interviewing families, group and jury processes, professional supervision, and mediation counselling. Weekly meetings will also deal with the conduct of professional psychologists, with a strong focus on the maintenance of ethical practices. Students are advised to take official leave in order to meet the demands of this course. To meet the requirements of this course student must complete at least 100 hours of professional practice, including professional seminars, workshops, and external placements. All placement and activity associated with this course must be done in writing with the approval of the Course facilitator. A Course portfolio is required for the organization and documentation of the practical component of this course. This portfolio shall constitute 60% of course work. Students have a maximum of 30 days to complete the requirements of this part of the course. Students must complete a minimum of three different field placements, which may include the courts, police, prisons, or other related forensic settings. N.B. Students are advised to take fulltime leave in order to meet the demands of this course.

Marriage and Family Counselling (MACMF 600)

Credits:3

This course surveys the history and major contemporary approaches to couple, marriage and family counseling. Focusing on the systemic perspective, consideration is given to sociocultural factors and diversity, family life cycle/development, healthy family functioning, approaches to prevention as well as intervention, various practice settings, professional organizations and licensing, systemic conceptualizing of presenting concerns and family dynamics, systemic assessment and procedures in a multicultural society, whom to involve in the therapeutic process, evidence-based treatments, an overview of marriage enrichment resources and relevant research findings that inform the practice of marriage, couple, and family counseling prevention and intervention.

Family Therapy (MACMF 602)

Credits:3

This course explores and applies fundamental knowledge and skills utilized in the treatment of relational systems. Perceptual, conceptual and executive skills will be developed through direct case application of required reading as well as simulated therapy sessions with specific client families. The student will also demonstrate an awareness of current best practice strategies, while also exploring issues of justice and advocacy as embedded in relational ethics and the challenge of interpersonal forgiveness. In addition, the student will identify multi-model intake and initial assessment methods. Instruction format includes a hybrid-learning environment utilizing both face-to-face and online class activities.

Child and Adolescent Disorders (MACSC 600)

Credits:3

The goal of this course is to provide students with a concentrated study of various childhood and adolescent disorders. The etiology, diagnostic criteria, assessment needs, and recommended intervention and treatment strategies of childhood disorders will be presented. A focus will be placed on understanding the disorders in school settings, including the role of Special Education. An integrative perspective will be taken that acknowledges biological, psychological, social, and cultural influences and their interdependence, and is guided by the consideration of developmental processes that shape and are shaped by the expression of these disorders. Co-morbidities and developmental norms that help inform diagnostic decisions will also be discussed.

Risk and Resiliency in Children and Youth (MACSC 601)

Credits:3

This course examines sources of biological and social risk that impede the development of personal wellness, academic achievement, and social competency in children and adolescents. Students explore the prevalence of these risk factors nationwide and in local communities, with emphasis on sources of resiliency that ameliorate risk and are enhanced by community, environmental, institutional, and cultural protective factors and opportunities. Students are exposed to and guided in assessing current, local partnerships between school, county, and community agencies addressing barriers that hinder children’s personal, social, and academic functioning. Students also gain an understanding of the multifaceted role school counselors have as advocates for and designers of policies, comprehensive programs, and collaborative services that are equitable and responsive to the needs of diverse children and their families. Legal and ethical issues in working with these populations are addressed throughout the course.

Strategies in School Guidance and Counselling (MACSC 602)

Credits:3

This course integrates theory, practice, and research to provide an overview of school counseling models, services, and skills. Students will familiarize themselves with governmental policy or models on guidance and counselling. They will become familiar with the roles and functions of the professional school counselor across levels. Students will understand different models of and develop essential skills in consultation, coordination, and collaboration. They will understand how school counselors advocate and take leadership for systemic change. Students will develop skills for designing, implementing, evaluating, and advocating for comprehensive school counseling programs that include all students and meet the needs of diverse student populations. Students will begin to develop a professional identity as School Guidance Counsellors.

Counselling in the School Setting (MACSC 604)

Credits:3

This course examines counseling practices and theory in relation to children and adolescents in the school setting and the role and function of the Counselor as a partner in the learning process. Focus is on developmental needs and age-related issues; guidance counseling in classroom and multicultural settings; collaboration with school team members and families, and related ethics. Special problems of physical and sexual abuse, substance abuse, suicide, and grief; and career and college preparation are also examined.